The Role Of Testosterone In Hair Loss: Demystifying The Connection

Have you heard of hormonal imbalances causing hair loss? In most situations, testosterone is the only hormone to blame.

Testosterone can cause bald spots on your scalp and reduce your hair’s thickness. Read on to learn how testosterone can result in hair loss and what you can do to stop it.

Both men and women produce testosterone, a type of androgen (male sex hormone). It is essential for the growth of your sexual organs.

Different hormones in your body impact the life cycle of your hair’s development. Androgens are among the hormones that promote scalp hair growth to a limited extent. Androgens target the growth of hair in the genital regions because their main purpose is to cause the development of sexual traits throughout puberty.

Different Testosterone Types

Your body has testosterone in a variety of forms. Your body has testosterone that is “free” and unattached to proteins. The most readily used type of testosterone is this one.

Role Of Testosterone In Hair Loss

A blood protein called albumin can bind to testosterone as well. Most testosterone is inactive because it is attached to the protein sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). A high free testosterone level may be present in your bloodstream if your SHBG level is low.

An enzyme converts testosterone into dihydrotestosterone (DHT). The potency of DHT is five times that of testosterone. The prostate, epidermis, and hair follicles are the primary locations where the body uses DHT.

Also Check: How To Stop Hair Loss In Teenage Guys?

What Impact On Your Hair Does Testosterone Have?

Both men and women produce testosterone, a type of androgen (male sex hormone). It is essential for the growth of your sexual organs.

Different hormones in your body impact the life cycle of your hair’s development. Androgens are among the hormones that promote scalp hair growth to a limited extent. Androgens target the growth of hair in the genital regions because their main purpose is to cause the development of sexual traits throughout puberty.

You lose scalp hair in several ways as you age because the scalp hair follicles become more vulnerable to the effects of androgens on the hair growth life cycle. Male-pattern baldness (MPB) and female-pattern hair loss (FPHL) are the names for it.

This Is How It Appears:

Men may experience a gradually receding hairline, hair loss at the temples, and a mid-frontal scalp, eventually forming a ‘U’ shape.

It is possible to detect diffuse hair loss, particularly on the scalp’s crown. The mid-frontal scalp shows broadening, but the hairlines do not recede.

Males may develop baldness. Female scalps rarely experience baldness but do have hair density loss.

An inconsistent diet or an erratic lifestyle might impair the function of your body’s hormonal glands, causing them to emit aberrant hormone levels. It changes how much hormone the body typically needs. In this instance, excessive androgen levels affect both scalp and body hair growth.

In other instances, despite the proper amount of hormones secreted by your hormonal glands, your hair follicles may still be vulnerable to strong androgens. Your hair follicle cells either carry a hereditary predisposition or you are aging.

Loss Of Hair In Women

Women who have androgenetic alopecia may also experience hair loss. Although testosterone levels in women are far lower than in men, they are strong enough to cause androgenetic alopecia.

Women experience hair loss differently. The front hairline does not change, but the top of the scalp does. DHT’s effects on hair follicles influence female-pattern hair loss (FPHL).

Testosterone Effects On Hair Loss

Free testosterone and DHT are two different forms of testosterone. After puberty, an enzyme converts 10% of free testosterone daily to dihydrotestosterone (DHT). When it comes to the development of sexual traits, DHT is more effective than testosterone.

DHT, a testosterone byproduct, reduces hair growth in both men and women. Your hair follicles are vulnerable to DHT’s strong nature, which shortens the hair development cycle. Excessive DHT binds the hair follicle gene receptors, causing the hair follicles to contract and stop growing new hair.

Is Testosterone-Related Hair Loss Reversible?

If you receive the proper care, testosterone hair loss is temporary and can be treated. First, excluding any underlying medical issues is helpful. By examining the patterns and bald spots, your doctor can determine whether hormones cause the hair loss.

If necessary, he may suggest a medical examination. Regrowing hair is a process that takes time. A few months of leading a healthy lifestyle are required.

Read More: What Are The Vital Nutrients That Increase Hair Growth For Teens?

Conclusion

Excess testosterone is not the only factor in all cases of hair loss. Despite the fact that both testosterone and estrogen are known to hinder hair formation in vitro, the relationship between testosterone and hair loss is complicated and genetically determined. Male pattern baldness, also known as androgenic alopecia, is caused by the hair follicles’ susceptibility to DHT, a hormone made from testosterone.

Male pattern baldness is characterized by an increasing T/E ratio and high DHT levels. Women who experience frontal-central pattern hair loss have appropriate levels of circulating androgen. Many types of testosterone in the body, such as free testosterone and DHT, bind to proteins and shrink hair follicles, causing hair loss and delaying the formation of new hair strands. Both low and high testosterone levels can cause hair loss.

About the Author

Nicole Carter is a dedicated and passionate nutritionist, committed to helping individuals achieve their health and wellness goals through the power of proper nutrition. With a Bachelor's degree in Nutritional Science and years of practical experience.

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